Marshawn Lynch and the Plight of Beast Mode at Super Bowl Media Day

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“Town bidness gone be in the billing.” Marshawn Lycnh’s response to Deion Sanders’ question about whether his family would be in attendance at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey for Super Bowl XLVIII was mind-blowing for some (present company included), and head-scratching for others.

Marshawn Lynch is a Legend.

Regardless of your opinion of the Seahawks’ all-time leading rusher in the postseason, this truth remains evident.

No player in recent NFL memory has entered the league with a vernacular as unique and a mouthpiece as flossy as the self-proclaimed Beast Mode (with the gold grill to prove it).

Whilst some people listen to Marshawn Lynch with confusion, baffled by the words coming out of his mouth and searching for their meaning like a double rainbow, I prefer to hear Marshawn Lynch.

Lynch is from the “Town,” one of the many nicknames given to Oakland, one of the larger influences on the planet commonly known as the Bay Area, known for producing a legendary dialect and level of game that would drive the average square insane.

What makes the Bay Area its own planet is the fact that is like no other place on Earth, alienated with unique individuals who give no fucks about the outside perception of the world which they inhabit. Lynch embodies this mentality.

After a successful high school career at Oakland Tech, Lynch kept Town bidness in the billing and took his talents to Cal–where he turnt up like an oven all the way to the first-round of the NFL draft, AND provided one of the most legendary moments in college football history.

Known for kicking knowledge, Lynch decided to put his mouthpiece on the injured reserve this season, refusing to talk to the media and staying in his own lane. But in his attempt to avoid them loose lips, Lynch has become a focal point of  media saltiness for not messing with the folkers who might be are taping.

Lynch’s antics have drawn the ire of several members of the square sports media, with one square (who shall get no shine from this site) even attempting to snitch on Lynch to the NFL via social media–in a desert thirst attempt to knock Beast Mode’s hustle.

To avoid a hefty NFL fine, Lynch broke his silence at Super Bowl Media Day on Tuesday, speaking with Hall of Famer Deion Sanders of the NFL Network, and providing a candid glimpse into the mind of Beast Mode.

In their brief interaction which lasted less than 3 minutes, Lynch gave us all a lifetime’s worth of golden exposition of his character and what he stands for as a man.

Sadly, a large contingent of viewers out there, mostly square bears, were unwilling or unable to hear Beast Mode, or appreciate his desire to just want to play football and do his talking on the field.

Seahawks fans throw skittles on this dude every time he scores a touchdown, and the internet made him a legend a few years back after his mesmerizing run against the Saints spawned a generation of extraordinary humans proudly espousing “Hold My Dick!” to pay homage to Lynch’s unforgettable decision to leap into the end zone with a handful of hogg.

Lynch has chosen to stay posted in the cut whilst teammate Richard Sherman, who attended Lynch’s rival Stanford (known as Square West) has snatched up the limelight, with racially-charged debates arising as a result of Sherman’s emotional post game interview with Erin Andrews about brash black athletes being called a “thug,” “punk” or N-word (generally of the hard “R” variety), for talking shit and backing it up.

In the crazy, mixed up world of the square sports media (not unlike most things in life), as a black athlete you are damned if you do and damned if you don’t. Talk too much and you’re an asshole, thug or punk, don’t talk enough and you’re an asshole, thug or punk.

But Marshawn Lynch in a Legend. And this Sunday at Super Bowl XLVIII, Town bidness gone be in the billing.


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